USATSI_8239866_154158418_lowresThe Chicago Blackhawks will have to make do without goalie Corey Crawford, who’s expected to miss about three weeks of action thanks to what the club is calling a “lower body injury.”

Of course, most people know the real story. Crawford hurt his left foot while leaving a concert. A Rise Against concert, to be exact. Chris Kuc of the Chicago Tribune reported that Crawford “missed a step” walking out of the concert on Monday night.

“I’m not getting into the details. I’m just focused on getting back,” Crawford said. “It’s a tough bounce for me and like I said, I feel pretty bad about it. I just want to be out there playing hockey.”

These sorts of off-ice injuries are almost always heavily scrutinized because everybody knows hockey players shouldn’t have lives outside of the game because they’re paid so much. Just ask Claude Giroux or Erik Johnson or Brian Leetch or Joe Sakic and his snowblower, for crying out loud.

Reporters wondered whether Crawford had been drinking while at the Rise Against concert, but he wouldn’t get into any details. He did note that when he woke up the following morning, he was in a lot more pain.

Prior to the injury, Crawford saw 14 straight starts for the Blackhawks. He is 12-5-1 this season with a 1.87 goals against average and a .927 save percentage. He missed six games earlier this season with an upper body injury.

“Things were going really well,” Crawford said. “Right now I’m just thinking about trying to get back as quickly as possible and make sure I’m right back where I was when I left off.”

The Blackhawks will have to lean on goalie Antti Raanta and Scott Darling, who was called up from Rockford on Tuesday.

The Blackhawks are also without Patrick Sharp and defenceman Trevor van Riemsdyk, who’s out three to four months with a fractured patella. Sharp is apparently close to returning and he’s been skating with the team.

As for Crawford, hopefully he’ll be able to rise against this setback and return to form as soon as possible. You’re welcome.

Advertisements