USATSI_7870005_154158418_lowresTo the surprise of nobody, legendary goaltender Martin Brodeur has announced his retirement from the NHL. He will join the front office of the St. Louis Blues.

The move will be made official at a press conference to take place on Thursday.

As readers will recall, Brodeur took time off earlier on the month to “ponder his future.” The buzz at the time was that he was mulling retirement and that seems to have come to fruition. Brodeur signed a one year contract with the Blues back in December after their starting goalie, Brian Elliot, went down with a knee injury. With Elliot back, there’s no room in St. Louis for Brodeur.

The 42-year-old is the holder of many, many NHL records and he will go out as one of the best goalies and players to ever lace the skates. He posted a final shutout to cap his NHL career when he was between the pipes as the Blues took down the Colorado Avalanche on December 29 for a 3-0 final.

Upon his retirement, Brodeur had an amazing 691 wins. That’s 140 more than any other goaltender. Brodeur stopped 3,121 more shots than any other goaltender, too. And he logged the most minutes.

Taking it back to shutouts reveals 125 of them, 22 more than the next goaltender on the all-time list. He also has more post-season shutouts than the great Patrick Roy, who played in 42 more post-season games. He has started in 204 Stanley Cup playoff games. He won 113 of them.

“I mean, hockey had to change the rules because of Marty, and that’s impressive,” forward Scott Gomez said. “I got two Stanley Cup rings because of the guy. Look at the banners of [Scott Niedermayer, Scott Stevens and Ken Daneyko] and Marty is right up there when you think about the New Jersey Devils; he was part of the core group and he’ll go down as one of the greatest goalies ever.”

Obviously New Jersey will wind up retiring Brodeur’s jersey in the potentially near future and general manager Lou Lamoriello noted that there were options for him in the Devils’ front office, but right now the commitment is with the Blues and that’s where he’ll stay for the time being.

But it will be impossible to shake his legacy in New Jersey. He won three Cups there and put together a career for the ages as a Devil. Seven games in the St. Louis net will not take anything away from the indelible mark he made in the Garden State and players, fans, coaches, and media types will be talking about him for a long time.

“He’s a Hall of Famer; one of the best to play the position of all time, was great in the locker room and the way he practiced was contagious,” defenceman Andy Greene said. “You enjoyed competing with him because of the way he worked and the effort he put in. The three goalies that jump out at me off the top of my head who were generational stars were Marty, Patrick Roy and [Dominik] Hasek.”

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