USATSI_9059087_154158418_lowresDaniel Sedin has become the all-time leader in goals for the Vancouver Canucks. He set the marker when he scored the first of two goals on Thursday night, leading to a 4-2 victory against the Boston Bruins.

Sedin broke a tie with former leading scorer Markus Naslund at 7:03 of the third period, potting his 347th career goal and passing Naslund’s 346 career goals. Trevor Linden is third on the all-time list of Canucks scorers with 318, while Stan Smyl has 262 and Pavel Bure clocks in at 254 goals.

Over the course of 1,109 NHL games, Sedin has 348 goals and a total of 924 points.

For his part, Naslund had 869 career points over the course of 1,117 career NHL games for the Pittsburgh Penguins, Canucks and New York Rangers. He posted 395 career goals.

Naslund and Sedin were teammates on the Canucks for seven seasons before Naslund was shuffled out of town to the Rangers for the 2008-2009 season. And now Sedin joins Naslund as the only other Canuck in franchise history to score more than 20 goals over the course of 10 seasons.

Henrik Sedin is the team’s all-time leader in points (952) and assists (732), however. He’s played 1,136 games for Vancouver and is currently on the shelf.

But Thursday night belonged to his brother Daniel, who passed Naslund’s record and added an empty-netter to set the Canucks at a 20-17-11 record this season. That’s good for second in the Pacific Division. They’ve gone 3-1-1 on their current six-game road trip, with a game to come against the Pittsburgh Penguins to polish off the stint.

The Canucks have been looking for a spark this season, though, and Sedin’s history-maker may have helped in terms of a moral boost. Regardless of what some crass naysayers submit, Daniel and Henrik Sedin have propelled the Vancouver franchise through the good, bad and ugly of the last several years and have led the team through some horrendous periods of uncertainty.

Daniel Sedin was the second overall draft pick of the rather odd 1999 NHL Entry Draft. Henrik Sedin was the third overall pick, while the Atlanta Thrashers picked up Patrik Stefan with their first overall pick. For trivia’s sake Pavel Brendl went fourth and Tim Connolly went fifth. Only four of the 26 first-round picks from the 1999 draft are still active in the NHL, by the way.

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