The Boston Bruins have defeated the Toronto Maple Leafs in Game Seven of their first round playoff series and are on their way to the second round.

The Bruins took down the Maple Leafs by a final score of 7-4 on Wednesday night.

Things were close for a while and it seemed like Toronto might pull off the victory and become the second Canadian team to make it to the second round this post-season.

But it was not to be.

The Bruins lit things up in the third period, scoring four unanswered goals after the Maple Leafs entered the final frame up a goal.

Toronto’s Patrick Marleau opened the scoring in the first period, notching his third of the series.

Boston’s Jake DeBrusk answered and tied it, but Marleau struck again less than two minutes later and momentum seemed to be going Toronto’s way. The Bruins scored two to close out the first, with Patrice Bergeron at last getting on the board.

The second period featured two goals for the Maple Leafs, with Newmarket’s Travis Dermott scoring his first of the series and Kasperi Kapanen popping in a short-handed marker. Dermott, by the way, became the first rookie defenceman in Maple Leafs history to score a goal in a Game Seven.

But that’s just trivia.

Torey Krug, DeBrusk and David Pastrnak scored for the Bruins in the third and Brad Marchand put things away for good with an empty-netter.

Boston will face the Tampa Bay Lightning in the second round and Toronto will have to unpack how things went so wrong in Game Seven.

The Bruins had the edge almost everywhere, snapping off more shots on goal and owning the Maple Leafs in the faceoff circle. Both teams scored once on the power play.

Toronto’s Mitch Marner led his team’s forwards in ice time and mustered three shots on goal. He posted an assist and was a minus-2. Marleau was second among his club’s forwards in ice time and he had exactly the kind of night expected of him, with two goals on two shots and four hits.

But the Bruins, with Bergeron just playing that much better than the opposition, had the answers all over again.

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